Lifeline News

NaLA Develops and Promotes Self Regulation in Lifeline Industry

The mission of the National Lifeline Association (NaLA) is to support the Lifeline Industry through “education, cooperation, and advocacy.” To further this goal, NaLA focuses on developing and implementing new self regulation processes. These processes strengthen the effectiveness of the Lifeline Program and bridge the digital divide for low-income Americans.

Self Regulation in Lifeline Industry

In the past three years, NaLA has grown from approximately 80 to more than 3,000 members. Represented within its member base are a variety of industry professionals, including Lifeline Providers (ETCs), Distributors, Agents, and other advocates.

Typically, Lifeline Providers, Distributors, and Agents approach self regulation individually. However, NaLA recognizes the benefit of resources that standardize Lifeline training and education. This realization led to development of a program for Lifeline Agent training, which launched in Spring 2018.

Launching the Agent Certification Program

The launch of the Agent Certification Program was a major milestone for NaLA. The training programwhich provides education on industry standards, regulatory compliance and industry-specific best practicesoffers Lifeline Providers (ETCs) a high quality resource for training their distributing agents.

The Agent Certification Program is already being utilized by nearly one dozen Lifeline Providers nationwide, and is in the process of expanding to include additional resources for internal compliance.

Recent Developments in Self Regulation of Lifeline

NaLA continues to build on these resources to assure the continued availability of the Lifeline Program, which is a critical tool in providing low-income Americans access to essential communication services.

In addition to providing training and education, the Agent Certification Program also establishes accountability between Agents and their Lifeline ETC partners. This accountability assists in promoting program integrity.

Future of Self Regulation of Lifeline

NaLA views the integrity of the Lifeline Program as a top priority, and continues to lead the industry with initiatives that support the Program’s success.

Through future developments in self regulation, NaLA is confident that the industry will be successful in realizing the vision for every American to have access to essential communication services.

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Lee SchaferNaLA Develops and Promotes Self Regulation in Lifeline Industry
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National Lifeline Association Welcomes Ali Badran As New Board Member

The National Lifeline Association (NaLA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Ali Badran, CEO of MoreAble, LLC and Aiobo.com, as the new member of the NaLA Board.

The National Lifeline Association (NaLA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Ali Badran, CEO of MoreAble, LLC and Aiobo.com, as the new member of the NaLA Board.

Mr. Badran brings to the position 15 years of wireless and seven years of Lifeline experience. He represents a collaborative and forward-thinking base of distributors and marketers of the Lifeline program.

Mr. Badran will be working closely with ETCs, community-based organizations, and marketing platforms to improve the Lifeline customer experience. He has a progressive perspective in supporting the interest, integrity and best practices of our rapidly growing Lifeline agent base. It will be his responsibility to continue to build an infrastructure that will support the NaLA Certified Agents within the Lifeline ecosystem.

“As always, there is a great deal of work needed to bring together the largest member group within NaLA,” said David B. Dorwart, Chairman of National Lifeline Association.

The board believes that Ali’s experience and leadership will help strengthen the integrity of the Lifeline program and uphold NaLA’s mission to support the providers, distributors, participants, and supporters of Lifeline through education, cooperation, and advocacy.”

Mr. Badran joins current NaLA Board Members: David B. Dorwart, Board Chairman of NaLA; William Curry, President at Life Wireless; Steve Klein, President at SafetyNet Wireless; David Avila, Associate Vice President at SafeLink Wireless; Kimberly Lehrman, President & Chief Marketing Officer at enTouch Wireless; and Nathan Stierwalt, Chief Sales & Marketing Officer at PWG Network Solutions.

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Lee SchaferNational Lifeline Association Welcomes Ali Badran As New Board Member
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NaLA Supports Q Link Waiver Petition Urging FCC to Accept Submissions for Lifeline Eligibility Pending Fully Functional API

Comments Filed November 23 in Support of Q Link National Verifier Waiver Request

Following the November 1 petition by Q Link Wireless, LLC, the National Lifeline Association (NaLA) filed comments supporting the Q Link Waiver Petition, which requests Lifeline eligibility submissions to the National Verifier.

Q Link Waiver Petition to FCC on National Verifier

Q Link initially petitioned for implementation of a service provider application programming interface (API) in the National Verifier in July 2018. The API, which would help millions of low-income Americans, including seniors, veterans, and disabled individuals enroll in Lifeline,  has yet to be implemented by the Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC), the administrator of the Lifeline Program.

As the National Verifier has been launched in over a half-dozen states without any such APIs, Lifeline service providers like Q Link Wireless are seeking other accommodations for Lifeline consumers’ eligibility submissions to the National Verifier.

The Q Link Waiver Petition, filed November 1, requests that service providers be permitted “to submit eligibility documentation to the National Verifier via bulk transfer to facilitate its review of consumer eligibility” in ‘hard-launch’ states.

NaLA Comments on Q Link Waiver Petition

In its comments, the National Lifeline Association (NaLA) agrees with Q Link and other Lifeline providers who recognize the consequences facing low-income consumers regarding timely access to phone and internet service, and concerns with data security and phishing scams.

In support of the Q Link Waiver Petition, NaLA strongly urges the FCC “to allow all ETCs to submit proof of eligibility documentation to the National Verifier in bulk as described in the Q Link Waiver Petition until USAC can implement a service provider API into the National Verifier.”

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Lee SchaferNaLA Supports Q Link Waiver Petition Urging FCC to Accept Submissions for Lifeline Eligibility Pending Fully Functional API
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1.3 Million Veterans Lifeline Service Could be Affected by FCC Proposed Changes

The Washington Times published an op-ed regarding how Veterans Lifeline service could be affected by FCC-proposed changes. Lifeline service is offered through the Lifeline Program, which connects low-income Americans to affordable telephony and broadband services for the purposes of health care, education and employment. 

The op-ed echoes TracFoneSprint, AARP and other groups who have stood up against the FCC proposals, and reminds readers that

if the FCC approves these changes, millions of Americans — including hundreds of thousands of veterans — will be left without this most basic daily need: a phone.”

Changes Affect Up to 1.3 Million Veterans’ Lifeline Service

Approximately one tenth of Lifeline participants are U.S. Veterans. These individuals, many of whom are retired or disabled, rely on their Lifeline service to communicate with doctors, employers, and other support resources.  

The proposed FCC changes would ban Wireless Resellers serving over 70% of Lifeline participants, which include veterans among other retired and disabled Americans. Veterans can be a particularly vulnerable demographic when it comes to physical health, mental health, and employment. They are also at increased risk for homelessness and suicide. 


Read the Op-Ed: Sustaining a vital veterans program

More than 1 million veterans rely on the Lifeline program connecting low-income households to essential services like health care, job opportunities and public safety. Also relied upon by seniors, the disabled, and many other Americans, the Lifeline program, started under President Ronald Reagan, gives low-income families discounts on phone and Internet services.

Unfortunately, proposed changes from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) threaten to undermine this vital program and hurt those who depend on it most.

Click here to read the full article

 

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Lee Schafer1.3 Million Veterans Lifeline Service Could be Affected by FCC Proposed Changes
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NaLA’s 2017 FCC Proposal Appeal Lands in DC for Oral Argument

On October 25, 2018, oral argument was held before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in the National Lifeline Association’s appeal of the FCC’s December 2017 proposal to ban resellers from the Tribal Lifeline program and to limit the program to rural areas.

NaLA’s Case for Appealing the 2017 FCC Proposal

The representative for NaLA opened by addressing the failure of the Commission to consider the impact of its Tribal Facilities Requirement and Tribal Rural Limitation on the primary goals of the Tribal Lifeline program, which are affordability and increased subscribership. Additionally, he asserted that “[b]ecause the Commission failed to account for a lack of affordable service options or even alternative service providers for many Tribal Lifeline customers, it failed to consider important aspects of the problem before it.”

Tribal Counsel Weighs in on 2017 FCC Proposal

Counsel for the Tribes also presented their concerns, arguing that the Order’s Tribal Facilities Requirement undermined the FCC’s goal of spurring investment because it would result in fewer service providers offering service and fewer people having access to Lifeline service. Counsel for the Commission argued that the FCC was entitled to deference, but came under sharp questioning from the three judge panel. Judge Rogers commented that the agency had “no backup” for its assertion that facilities-based providers would step in to replace resellers if they were banned.

 

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Lee SchaferNaLA’s 2017 FCC Proposal Appeal Lands in DC for Oral Argument
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National Lifeline Association Chairman Issues Statement Regarding FCC Enforcement Action Against American Broadband

David B. Dorwart, Chairman of NaLA, issues a statement regarding the FCC allegations of Lifeline rule violations and Notice of Apparent Liability against American Broadband


The allegations of Lifeline rule violations, including agent fraud and carrier misconduct, included in today’s FCC Notice of Apparent Liability against American Broadband, if proven to be true require nothing short of our absolute condemnation. We understand that the FCC has a process which will allow American Broadband to defend itself against these very serious and disconcerting allegations.

In the meantime, NaLA and its stakeholder members will continue the good work they do every day in bringing the Lifeline program to eligible subscribers. NaLA and its wireless reseller carriers work hard every day to ensure that only eligible subscribers get Lifeline benefits and that only eligible subscribers retain them. Today’s news will serve as a reminder to all Lifeline stakeholders just how important it is to achieve and maintain compliance in every facet of the good work that we do in ensuring Lifeline eligible low-income Americans are able to access this benefit that ensures essential voice and broadband connectivity.

The official press release can be reviewed here.

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Jordan MajkszakNational Lifeline Association Chairman Issues Statement Regarding FCC Enforcement Action Against American Broadband
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NaLA Comments on FCC Connected Care Pilot Program Notice of Inquiry

The National Lifeline Association (NaLA) filed a response to a recent Notice of Inquiry (NOI) regarding the Connected Care Pilot Program, a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) telehealth program that seeks to assist low-income Americans.

comments-fcc-connected-care-pilot-program-NOIFCC Promoting Telehealth for Low-Income Consumers

The Connected Care Pilot Program is part of an FCC telehealth initiative and would seek “to improve health outcomes among low-income Americans through the use of expanded access to telehealth services.” The $100 million FCC proposal for a Connected Care Pilot Program received unanimous approval in August 2018.

In the NOI, the FCC acknowledges an increasing reliance on broadband-enabled telehealth services when providing high quality health care. The pilot would improve healthcare for low-income consumers by bringing connected care resources to low-income Americans with a wide range of health challenges, including cancer treatment, pediatric heart disease, high risk pregnancies, stroke treatment, and diabetes management.

FCC Seeks Comment on Connected Care Pilot Program NOI

In response to the NOI, NaLA expressed concerns in a September 10, 2018 filing. As an organization that has long viewed Lifeline as a tool to increase access to healthcare for low-income consumers, NaLA supports the purpose of the Connected Care Pilot Program, but expressed two main concerns:

  1. Telehealth services provided by the program would not be offered to all low-income Americans who need them.  

    The NOI seeks comment on “limiting the participating health care providers’ use of the pilot program funding to Medicaid-eligible patients, as well as veterans who qualify based on income for cost-free health care benefits through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).”

    NaLA believes strongly that this limitation would lead to many exclusions of the low-income demographic for whom the program was designed to serve.

     

  2. The Commission would restrict provider participation to “Facilities-based” ETCs (providers).

    This restriction would further limit accessibility for low-income consumers who are in need of telehealth services by limiting the number of providers. The NOI suggests that such an approach would be consistent with the Lifeline program, proposing “that participants should be facilities-based … given that one of the goals of the pilot is to increase broadband deployment in unserved and underserved areas.”

    NaLA opposes this point, noting that nearly 70 percent of low-income consumers within the Lifeline program are served by non-facilities based ETCs (wireless resellers). Additionally, NaLA adds that resellers “have a unique expertise in locating, enrolling and serving the same communities that the Connected Care Pilot Program seeks to serve, i.e., low-income consumers and veterans”.

In conclusion, NaLA respectfully requested that the Commission design any Connected Care Pilot Program consistent with these comments to most effectively and efficiently meet the program goals.

View Full Response to the Connected Care Pilot Program NOI

 

Read NaLA’s September 10 Comments to the FCC Notice of Inquiry here.

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Lee SchaferNaLA Comments on FCC Connected Care Pilot Program Notice of Inquiry
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How the Lifeline Program Helps Sarah Victory Continue Her Journey in Being a Super Mom

“I am thankful enough to have an affordable phone service,”  44- year-old Sarah Victory from Coweta, Oklahoma says in a relieving tone. Sarah works from 3 pm to 11 pm as a Certified Nursing Assistant. She also takes care of her three children (one is her 3-year old autistic son)  and is the emotional support for her husband, who suffers from depression. Sarah happily says that at her workplace the patients label her “the best one” and it’s most likely due to her dedication at work and home. Being a family woman and the go-to-person can be overwhelming, but Sarah says that it’s her job as a mother and wife. Her day-to-day routine varies, but the one thing that is consistent is her consumer relationship with the Lifeline program.

With so many responsibilities, bills, and other family financial commitments, Sarah is happy that the Lifeline program is effective and efficient. Being enrolled in the Lifeline program has allowed Sarah to connect with her children, husband, and doctors. “Because I can’t afford normal service, being in the Lifeline program allows me to talk to my doctor and my child’s doctor,” she says. The convenience and affordability of her Lifeline phone service not only makes her life easy even when everything else is hectic, but it allows her to stay connected with the important aspects of her life. Because she has to keep a closer eye on her son’s health, being able to contact his doctor is important. If it were not for the Lifeline Program how else would Sarah keep up with her autistic son’s health? As a busy mother, wife, and employee, the victory is more than her last name; it’s in her Lifeline phone service.

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admin1How the Lifeline Program Helps Sarah Victory Continue Her Journey in Being a Super Mom
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NaLA Supports National Lifeline Awareness Week With Informational and Social Media Campaigns

NaLA Supports National Lifeline Awareness Week With Informational and Social Media Campaigns

Many eligible households who are not enrolled in the Lifeline program struggle to afford essential telephone service that allows them to reach emergency services, medical personnel, government services, schools, and potential employers. In fact, only 33% of those who are eligible for the Lifeline program are currently enrolled. Additionally, 46% of active Lifeline consumers are retired, disabled or unable to work, and rely on Lifeline for phone and broadband services every day. By raising awareness of the Lifeline program, NaLA seeks to educate those who may have been unaware of the availability of Lifeline and encourage those who are eligible to participate to enroll.

Now, more than ever, it is imperative to highlight the effect of Lifeline on the lives of low-income Americans. In 2017, the FCC proposed devastating changes to the Lifeline program which would significantly cut access to essential phone and broadband services for an estimated 8 million people, which is roughly 70% of Lifeline recipients currently enrolled in the program. The potential cutback of this program would have a profoundly negative impact not only on eligible seniors, the disabled and low-income consumers, but also the 28% of Lifeline consumers who are unemployed and actively looking for work.

“There is much work to be done when an estimated 67% of eligible consumers are not taking advantage of the Lifeline Program.”

“National Lifeline Awareness Week is important to NaLA because, at our core, we believe that every American should have access to essential communication services. There is much work to be done when an estimated 67% of eligible consumers are not taking advantage of the Lifeline Program,” says David B. Dorwart, Chairman of NaLA. “We are also excited to share the personal story of a current Lifeline consumer who expressed how profoundly Lifeline impacts her life. It is important for people to understand how the proposed FCC program changes could negatively impact vulnerable individuals,” he adds.

Because Lifeline affects millions of consumers every day, our service provider members and field agent members have partnered with us to generate informational and awareness campaigns in support of National Lifeline Awareness Week all across the country. Along with its service provider members, field agent members, and other advocates, NaLA continues to pursue changes that result in greater efficiency, accountability, and overall integrity in the Lifeline program. NaLA thoroughly believes in the importance of National Lifeline Awareness Week and applauds the organizations and regulatory bodies that support Lifeline and raise awareness during this week.

Read the original press release here.

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Stay Granted for FCC Tribal Lifeline Rules to Bar Wireless Resellers and Lower Subsidies for Tribal Consumers of Lifeline Program

The U.S. Court of Appeals granted National Lifeline Association (NaLA) and Tribal petitioners a stay of new FCC Tribal Lifeline rules that would have barred wireless resellers from providing Tribal Lifeline and would also limit the Tribal Lifeline program to rural Tribal areas.

The Court stated that the FCC’s plan does not consider the harm it can cause to Lifeline businesses and customers. It is estimated that 70% of eligible consumers receive their Lifeline service from wireless resellers. The Court added that these actions would “result in a major reduction, or outright elimination, of critical telecommunications services” for Lifeline consumers and “substantial, unrecoverable losses” for Lifeline providers. Many Tribal consumers do not have an alternate option to obtain Lifeline phone or internet services if a wireless reseller ban were to be implemented. In addition, the FCC “identified no evidence of fraud or misuse of funds in the aspects of the program at issue here,” the Court wrote.

The judges also rejected the FCC’s claim that reducing subsidies would cause carriers to build their own networks in Tribal areas. They said the Commission failed to show any historical evidence that reducing subsidies would lead to more infrastructure investment. This argument was the justification for the new FCC Tribal Lifeline Rules that would eliminate wireless resellers from providing services on Tribal lands. The judges stated that the record suggested just the opposite.

In reaching its decision, it appears the Court understood that wireless resellers play a critical role in connecting low income consumers to essential communications services through the Lifeline program. Disconnecting consumers causes a digital divide.

“NaLA is pleased that the Court heard and agreed with the arguments presented and that the Court took action so the case can be decided without Tribal Lifeline subscribers, or the companies that work to serve them, suffering irreparable harm,” said David B. Dorwart, Board Chairman of NaLA. “In reaching its decision, it appears the Court understood that wireless resellers play a critical role in connecting low income consumers to essential communications services through the Lifeline program. Disconnecting consumers causes a digital divide. It does not put them first, nor does it further the Lifeline program’s core goal of ensuring that our nation’s most vulnerable consumers stay connected by making service affordable. NaLA looks forward to continue working with all stakeholders to preserve and protect the integrity of the Lifeline program so we can strive to meet this important goal.”

As advocates for preserving Lifeline, NaLA is encouraged by the Court’s statement that, “Petitioners have demonstrated a likelihood of success on the merits of their arguments.” The decision to halt the FCC’s move to prevent wireless resellers and lower Lifeline subsidies for Tribal areas is a big win for low-income Tribal consumers.

Read the full court order here: United States Court of Appeals Case #18-1026 Document #1744949 Filed on 08/10/2018

Read the original press release here.

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Jordan MajkszakStay Granted for FCC Tribal Lifeline Rules to Bar Wireless Resellers and Lower Subsidies for Tribal Consumers of Lifeline Program
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